Singles Ad


I HAD to reblog this . . .

Originally posted on Piglove:

You know everyone in the world is looking for love – some in the wrong places for sure – snorts.  This weekend I came across the most perfect singles ad that was posted in our local newspaper, The Atlanta Journal.  Why do you ask?  Read on to see what it said:

“Single black female seeks male companionship, ethnicity unimportant.  I’m a very good looking girl that loves to play.  I love long walks in the woods, riding in your pick up truck, hunting, camping, fishing trips and cozy winter nights lying by the fire.  Candlelight dinners will have me eating out of your hand.  I’ll be at the front door when you get home from work wearing only what nature gave me.  Call XXX-XXXX and ask for Daisy.”

Sounds sexy enough huh?  Over 15,000 men found themselves calling the number and talking to the Atlanta Humane Society abut an…

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3 quotes in 3(?) days/periods of time/weeks/??? Post #2

I think I should warn you . . . a cuppa won’t last through this post; best make a big pot of tea, coffee, whatever suits you today . . .

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Above is a half-grown magpie rescued by the Crafties. I was there visiting and had the joy of feeding it and holding it for most of the time I was on the front porch.

The Three Quote Challenge . . .

Well, I did warn you that it might take a bit for me to finish this challenge . . . :-) (and to learn more about it, visit Pauline & the 3 Quote Challenge and you can follow back -or forward- to some of the many others who are taking part). Pauline threw the gates open to volunteers, so feel free to join in. Maybe let Pauline (and Apple Pie and Napalm) know you are coming to the party . . .

Back in 1970 I had a wonderful woman doctor who introduced me to alternative approaches to health and healing. A few years later she had her license taken away by the medical association, not for causing any harm, but for “unorthodox practises”. Being a woman doctor AND unorthodox . . . oh, my!

Among the sources and ideas she shared with me was a book about Edgar Cayce, now widely regarded as the father of holistic healing and medicine.

His work has helped me ever since then and I have always had positive results from applying his recommendations for  physical healing. But it was his suggestions for mental, emotional and spiritual growth that have helped me the most.



Canada Day, 01 July





The past weeks have been very challenging for me; I took my Mum to the ER on the 13th of July. As it turned out, she had a serious inflammation in her lower left leg and both lower legs had been swollen for some time, something she was able to hide for quite a while. Since at first we were told it might be staph, or strep or a super-bug, my RN sister, who had been here for a visit just days previously, flew back to help me thoroughly clean most of the condo. It was a massive job, especially for someone who has been extremely sedentary for the past three years (that would be me . . .)

Once done the cleaning, my sister and I were able to get some much-needed organizing done, along with some unpacking. The place looked SO much better by the time she had to leave.


See . . . ? The front hall, formerly half-full of boxes.

Mum came home on the 22nd, my sister returned on the 23rd, along with our last living Auntie and the Celebration of Life for my Aunty who passed away in April was held on Saturday the 25th. People brought photo albums and it was good to see new photos of my older family. Here are a few: IMG_9905

My maternal grandparents, around the time of their engagement and marriage, probably 1910 or ’11. They met and married in North Dakota, had two children, then moved, along with her parents and several siblings, to Saskatchewan.


My grandmother, standing, whom I never met, as she died in 1933. She loved her hats and I wish at least one and some of her lovely clothing, had survived the years. That’s one of her sisters sitting in the chair,


My Aunty when she was young.


My maternal grandparents and the first seven of eleven children. One died at birth and the girl with the black curly hair died at ten years. My Mum is the baby here, held by her mother. It was the day she and her next older sister (in the chair beside the eldest girl) were christened. The wee girl on the right, with her Dad’s arm around her, is my Aunty that I stayed with for so much of the past three years. Behind them is one of their early homes.

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This summer we have had very nice weather for the most part. Often coolish, rarely baking hot, just what I like. But not much rain and we could really use some. We had two thunderstorms this past week or so and I loved the light-show, but rain would have been most welcome . . . we seem tyo be teetering on the edge of a drought and that’s scary. The storm above was lovely to watch as it approached over the hill/berm to the west, but didn’t bring much moisture with it.

The Celebration went well and I met relatives I knew only by name and from hearing stories about them through the years. It was good to see others that I had not seen for more than six years, too. My cousin (the younger of my Aunty’s two sons, gave a beautiful eulogy, although he had a hard time getting through some parts.

By Tuesday, the relatives were all gone home again and life began to return to normal, or NiRmL, as I think of it these days.

Then I developed swelling in both my lower legs, a fair bit in the left leg. And then what looked like a pressure sore developed, then another, both just where my short socks’ elastic presses. Then the spots joined and began spreading around my ankle . . .

(hold on, there’s a reason I’m sharing all this)

But first, while looking for a quilting pattern, I stumbled upon this post, put up five years ago by Nan from Pots & Pins blog:  her recipe for Butter Cream Scones

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Of course, first thing I did was to mess around with it, sort of like the Water Rat in The Wind in the Willows, thinking to myself in a parody of said Rat, “Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing—absolutely nothing—half so much worth doing as simply messing about with recipes. Simply messing,” I went on dreamily: “messing—about—with—recipes; messing—”

And so I swapped out 1/4 cup of the flour for 1/4 cup of wheat germ, and swapped 1/4 of the baking powder for an equal amount (more or less) of baking soda, then at the last minute I added a few drops of lemon juice to the cream . . . like I said, simply—messing about . . . and the results were beyond scrumptious; my Mum, whose appetite has not been what it once was, loved these, warm and buttered and topped with jam. The first batch was gone the next day, so I made another . . . Two of those were given to a visiting relative and the rest somehow—just—vanished . . . Yesterday we finished off the third batch and I plan to make more tomorrow. Yes, they are that good!

I have been thinking of other variations that are possible, too, but so far we are so happy with this one it’s all we want. But if the sugar was cut way back and grated cheese added to the dry mix, along with some chopped savoury herbs or maybe some jalapeno peppers chopped very fine . . . now that would be a perfect accompaniment to a winter soup or stew. Savoury cheese scones are wonderful served with butter and jalapeno jelly, too . . . Or the dough could be dropped into a pot of simmering chicken soup by the tablespoonful to make most excellent dumplings . . . or . . . Well, anyway, one must leave something for the cold winter months, mustn’t one? Besides, what I did instead deserves its own post, but won;t get one . . . it will simply have to be content with a mention here:

I sliced some fresh strawberries and cooked then with a little water and berry sugar, let it cool, then added more sliced berries and mashed them a wee bit with a strong fork. Ileft the pot on the stove to stay warm, but with the heat turned off. I heated the scones in the microwave, split them, spooned the berry mixture and syrup over  both halves, then topped with whipped Natrel lactose-free cream. A slice of berry as garnish, plus an attempt at artful garnishing with a spoonful or so of extra syrup, and we had a dessert fit for queens and empresses . . .

shortcake 01

So;,if you have the care of someone whose appetite needs tempting, I highly recommend these; we love them (if that wasn’t obvious already . . .)

Back to the Three Quote Challenge . . . sort of . . .

As some of you know, I’m not one for conventional medicine unless maybe if I were to break a bone or the like, or if I simply couldn’t figure out a problem . . . so I did some online research, seeing as how my reference books are all living in the Land of Somewhere still . . . and from those results and from my memory of treatments that have served me well over the years, I came up with a plan: I have begun walking daily, usually with my good friend C, who drives over most mornings to join me. This gives us both a chance to debrief about various events in our lives, which is so helpful.

I’ve returned to a veggie-rich alkalizing diet along with a few other tried and true alkalizers. No need to wait until I have an actual infection, I say . . .

In addition to walking, I am using castor oil on both legs, along with gentle massage. Yesterday I used wet packs of epsom salts and sea salt, dissolved in hot water. And today, when C dropped by with four mojitos for us (for today and tomorrow), she did some energy work on my foot, and there was much less swelling for the rest of the day and through the night.

mojito one

fresh Lime and Mint Mojito from The Tea Place

The Tea Place in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada is the most fantastic food place I’ve eaten at in decades; My friend C took me there the first time and we’ve been there as often as possible since. The bubble teas are exceptional.

Last time C drove me around for several hours doing errands while we visited, we went to The Tea Place for lunch. There were salmon avocado wraps on the menu, but not the paninis I loved last summer. When I mentioned this to the owner, who was waiting on us, he immediately said that he could make that for us, and he did. Salmon, avocado and just enough wasabi to make its presence known. (this mix would be wonderful added to a green salad, making it into a full meal)The panini, along with a small bowl of Thai curry chicken soup, was as wonderful as ever. With it we had a fresh Lime & Mint Mojito, with slices of lime and sprigs of mint in each drink. Non-alcoholic, it was the most refreshing beverage I’d had in ages. I kept my mint to start my own plants (which is why C showed up yesterday with four more!) and by luck(is there such a thing?), I’d just purchased a bag of organic limes at the grocery store. I plan to try hot Mojitos this winter, too . . .

We finished up with a shared piece of Red Velvet cake and left happy!

If you are ever in Edmonton, I highly recommend at least one visit to The Tea Place (and no, they don’t even know I’m mentioning them; I just like to promote small businesses that are exceptional in nature and performance.)

NOTE: I started writing this on Tuesday, 11 August, but now it’s Wednesday :-)

I got up this morning and there was almost NO swelling in either foot or leg! I was able to walk faster, so we went nearly a quarter block further in our 15 minutes, then turned around to come back. There is a wee bit of swelling in the left foot now, as I’e been at the computer for a while and the position I work in is not optimal. But I;ll put it up for a bit after we eat.

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This is the Mountain Ash tree that I can now walk past in our 15 minutes; it’s gorgeous, but I’m wondering (based on the number of berries) if we are in for a hard winter . . .

We also pass by the most beautiful, inspiring flower garden on our walk and one day we stopped and crossed the street to photograph it. It wasn’t until C commented that I saw the fenced veggie patch in the middle and towards the back.

garden 01 garden 02

What a wonderful way to use a front yard instead of planting a hay crop, then working to keep it three inches tall . . . I know the photos don’t do it justice; use your imagination . . .

All right, I hear you! on to the Quotes . . .


There are many quotes from Edgar Cayce that have meant much to me over the years, but I’ll only share two today:

There is so much good in the worst of us, and so much bad in the best of us, that it doesn’t behoove any of us to speak evil of the rest of us.

It’s so easy to point fingers and criticize; so much better to hold out a helping hand or at least put that hand to better use.

I first came across this in reading a book about his work, but I don’t think it originated with him. Worth thinking about, in any case.

The other quote has been my favourite for over forty years:

Be content, but not satisfied.

To me, this means finding a way to be happy where you are, whatever the situation, while at the same time doing what you can to improve things, make progress, however you want to put it. I had sort of forgotten about the ‘be content’ bit and so began my slide into a too-long stay in the unhappy land of Overwhelm.

Another lesson learned, and about time, too. Pauline, the Contented Crafter, has taught me quite a bit about contentment on a daily basis, whatever your situation, and I think sets a great example in her practise of not getting up in the morning until she has found something to be grateful for. I need to do this myself, I think.

Well, there’s another post coming with more quotes. In the meantime, how about some music?

A beautiful acoustic love song: The Beat of You with Iain Bayne of Runrig, Paul Eastham of Coast and Douglas Chisholm of Wolfstone.

A bit more rockin; is Hopeless Wanderer by Mumford and Sons, from their latest album, Wilder Minds. Cute banjo segment, I thought. Wilder Minds, indeed . . .

Delta Blues, a couple of hours of old style classics.

Glenn Gould’s Bach – The Goldberg Variations

John Prine in 1980 singing about the horrors of strip mining: Paradise. This one’s more like a home video, but cool to see him as a young man. Here’s another of my favourites by him: Hello In There. So true . . . old age and loneliness . . .

An old favourite is Al Stewart singing Roads to Moscow

A bit of fun is called for after that . . .

Hush Little Baby

  • cello:Yo-Yo Ma
  • vocal:Bobby McFerrin
  • violin:Mark o’Connor
  • contra bass:Edgar Meye

and although I’ve posted this before, here it is again:

Ave Maria – Bobby McFerrin teaching a Master Class

bet you won’t be expecting this one . . . Come Together

but you will be expecting at least one song by Runrig, right?

A fun start to this, an impromptu blues jam, with great guitar by Malcolm Jones, during the sound check, segueing into The Cutter

You won’t be surprised to learn that attending a Runrig concert is high on my bucket list, may they play so long . . .

Well, that’s it for now, my friends . . .

3 quotes in 3(?) days/periods of time/weeks/???

. . . but hopefully not 3 aeons . . .

I have been nominated by my loving friend, Pauline, The Contented Crafter, which is a good thing, as now I will post ‘something’ at least. I’ve been rather busy with one thing and another lately and most lax about posting and responding to comments. Again, my apologies. And to quote a poster my Mum had up for some time: “if it’s not one thing, it’s your Mother!” Anyway . . .

I don’t know how regular these will be; we have the Celebration of Life for my Aunty this coming Saturday and family members are coming from all over, which is nice, but means I likely won’t see the computer much for a wee bit. When the dust settles . . .

My first quote is from a woman who has inspired me for many years. In the spirit of Gandhi, she owned only  the clothes on her back, a notebook and pencil. No money. She walked across the USA  at least eight times and if you added the partial trips, some say up to thirty times or more. She was flown to Hawai’i and Alaska so she could walk there, too. In 1952 she changed her name to ‘Peace Pilgrim’ and began walking for Peace. She did this until she died nearly thirty years later. She vowed to walk until offered shelter and to fast until offered food and she kept those vows. Her words and writings are available free, thanks to a group of her friends/followers who keep them published. Donations are not necessary, but are accepted with thanks if anyone is moved to help with that mission.

You can read about her here: Peace Pilgrim and her writings are online here: Peace Pilgrim book in seven languages.

One of my favourite quotes from her work is:

aa peacepilgrim 01

Many of you, no doubt all of you, have your daily life challenges. In the midst of all that, I wish you Peace as it is defined here.

More to come and thank you, Pauline (I think :-)  No, seriously, thank you!).  ~ Linne

And my favourite Peace song: Let There Be Peace On Earth, and Let It Begin With Me

Summary of the Green New Deal: “The Green Party is no longer the alternative, the Green Party is the imperative”

March, April, May . . . part Two (and a bit of June)


Hard to believe this was what we saw on 06 May this year, isn’t it? In 2014 the last snow was on the sixth of May.

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Below is the bus stop when I went out for groceries.


And here are some pictures of my CAL (Crochet-A-Long) blanket. This is the second of three that I started back in early January. It’s finished now. I did try adding a single row of red along the border, and then I tried adding it just down from the edge, but in the end I decided it really was ‘gilding the lily’ and took it out again. You may notice that there is a band of light mossy green, white and a darker, more bluish green near each end. I thought the light moss colour would work, but then wasn’t happy with it. Rather than undo it, I simply turned the blanket around and began working from the beginning,, creating matching odd bands. I rather like it now, as the odd bit doesn’t stand out so much and looks as though it may have been planned. Oh, well, it will be warm anyway.

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When my CAL group were learning ripple stitch, I was still working on the CAL blankets, so instead of beginning a new blanket, I made a pillow cover for a pillow I already had. I rather like it! I made a fancy edge for the closing (it’s folded and stitched to form an envelope), then realized the dark burgundy wouldn’t stand out at all, so I added the white section. There’s always a solution, isn’t there?

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I love this tree so much! It stands just outside the patio doors and this is what I see from where I sit on the couch. I have now seen it bare of leaf, covered in snow, then covered in blossoms. I have no idea what this tree is, but it’s wonderful to look at. Below are photos of the flowers. They have a nice scent, not too strong and not really perfumed.

IMG_9339 IMG_9338 IMG_9369I chanced upon this photo while looking for something else (and isn’t that always the way?) Turns out these are called ‘lenticular’ clouds. I was particularly interested because I only ever saw them once in my life. It  was the day that we buried my Aunt A and Uncle P’s ashes (in the grave of my uncle’s father. He was my dad’s father, too. My dad and his brother married sisters, so their son is my closest cousin). Later that day, my cousin and his wife, one of my brothers, one of my sisters and her daughter plus myself went for supper at a local restaurant. When we came out, it was just sunset and the sky was full of these. None of us had seen them before and, of course, none of us had a camera along. (That was before smartphones and the like). I hurried to the pharmacy, but they were closed already; the usual thing in small towns. So we simply stood on the street corner and looked for as long as the light allowed. There were seven large ones and a bunch of smaller ones and to me it felt like a message from beyond the veil. One of the most beautiful moments of my life and one I will never forget. I was so pleased to find out there was a name for these clouds, after years of asking people and trying to look them up.



Does anyone have any idea why a good friend would post this on her Facebook page?

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Lately I have felt that I was receiving messages from the Universe . . . I was so startled when these began appearing on our pancakes once I turned them over. Then, sadly, I figured it out . . . the pattern is caused by the way I pour the batter into the hot pan. They are lovely, though, aren’t they? I just had to share these with you . . .

The smiley one had an actual slit forming the mouth and a day later it looked like this:


. . . and then I ate it! Mmmmm   these are a variation of the Norske egg pancakes that my sister in New Mexico sent me; we have them a couple of times most weeks. Of course, being me, I had to mess around with the (perfectly good and delicious) original recipe . . . but they are still yummy . . .

IMG_9459 IMG_9458Another sister, the one who lives on BC’s Wet Coast, recommended a book called “You are not your Brain” and I ordered it, and a few more in that vein, from our library. She gets an email called the Brain Bulletin and sent me one of them that had fascinating information about our brains; how if we hold negative thoughts we damage our brains physically and how the scientists think it’s related to some forms of dementia, memory loss, etc. I really needed to hear all that. These books had a cursory glance from me and look quite promising, but I showed them to a friend and now they are at her home for a while. I’ll let you know if I learn anything helpful from them. And if any of you are interested in the Brain Bulletin, let me know in your comment and I can give you a link to sign up for them. Another book that came in is for children with OCD. It’s called “What to do When Your Brain Gets Stuck”. I thought it might have some useful information in it.

IMG_9463I don’t know where this originated, but a good friend sent it to me. I’m working on the lists now because I thought this was good advice, especially for me, as I tend to put off doing the things that make me happy, then feel a bit ‘down’ or discouraged. Crazy, eh?

IMG_9471 IMG_9469I have now cooked up two pots of beans (one pound each of black and pinto) and they are in one-cup bags in the freezer waiting for inspiration to strike me . . . I did eat some cold, right out of the pot . . . It’s so nice to have an second refrigerator; I keep extra veggies in it, as well as extra bread.


I am still working on the third CAL afghan that I began back in January, but two are finished now. While I’ve been working, I’ve been thinking about possible uses for the leftover yarn; there’s quite a bit of it (this is the yarn I bought so I could use up two balls that I already had; this was back last summer, when I first became excited about the Bavarian afghans). Nothing like downsizing, is there? So I decided to make myself a granny square afghan. Of course I began with what might have been a traditional square, but, as you can see, that didn’t last too long . . . This is what I have done so far. Turns out I’m going to have to make two afghans to use up that yarn; one with these colours and some grey that I think will go well with them, and another with the more vibrant reds and blues, purples and white. When I’m done I will have memory afghans from the times I sat working and chatting with my Aunty, whom I still miss every day.

I made three traditional squares so far from the reds and blues, but don’t have a picture handy to share. Next time , , , one of the squares was begun before my Aunty died and finished the following week, so it will be in the centre, along with one for my Mum and one for me. It may take a while, though.

On a completely different note: I’ve taken on some computer work, formatting pages for a huge contract that my sister here is working on. Her company does a lot of that sort of work and it’s good for me, as I can work from home and fit the time in around my Mum’s schedule. It’s a bit of a learning curve, as I’m using a new laptop and the latest Windows program, where my familiar icons and buttons, etc., are gone and I now have to hunt for much of what I used to use on automatic pilot. A glutton for punishment, I have taken two books out of the library that deal with writing apps for iPhones and iPads, but have only glanced at them so far. I have to say, in my defence, that I ordered them before I knew I’d be working again. Not sure if I’ll do anything in this line, but I was curious.


Some days I feel like a child again; the sun comes in through our north-facing windows around five am every morning. Child-like, I was holding my hand in front of the light to keep it out of my eyes and I noticed how it made my fingers nearly translucent. Just had to get a photo , , ,IMG_7364[1]

My friends the Crafties have begun bringing me some of the projects I had stored in their attic, as well as a box of yarn from the container on their property north of the city. Yes, more yarn . . . Once I have all the Décor yarn here, I plan to catalogue it by colour and amount of each, then I’m thinking I may be making some of those Cosy blankets that Lucy from Attic 24 makes. She started this whole CAL craze, at least in my world.  Above is my not-quite-finished Bavarian afghan that I call “Violets in the Snow”. It’s here in the condo now and I’ll be back to working on it soon, I hope. The hot pink Barn Cardi will be coming soon, too. Now I just need to plant me a lot of thyme . . .

Have a wonderful week, everyone. the laptop is set up for internet now, so I should be able to catch up on comments soon. (I’m using Mum’s computer for this post, though; it’s easier to type on and I’d already done half this post over the last few days, so thought I’d just finish here). I’ll be dropping in on you in the Virtual Village again, too. I’ve been sort of ‘ghosting’ through, reading as much as I could, clicking ‘like’ to let you know I’d been by, but often not able to leave comments easily. one finger typing on a phone isn’t my favourite thing, really. I’ve been thinking of all of you; those in the midst of winter and those out working in your gardens; and especially everyone who’s been affected by the droughts, storms and flooding. I was speaking with my cousin this week (the one I mentioned above) and where he lives (and where I spent my last few years at home) the temperatures have been up to +35C . . . it wasn’t like that when I lived there, back in the early ’60s. Global warming, indeed . . . Big hugs to all of you.


My sweet Aunty, patiently modelling the Barn Cardi for me.

And, like Columbo, just ‘one more thing’ . . .

I was lucky to catch this on TV recently, in time to record it: I’d never heard of Brit Floyd,, but they were great! I haven’t listened to much Pink Floyd for many years; what a blast from the past:

Brit Floyd Live at Red Rocks

. . . and that’s all, folks . . .




Bishops Call on G7 to Enact Global Bankruptcy Process to End Poverty


Instead of bankruptcy, why don’t we have something like the Year of Jubilee as the Hebrews used to have? I think forgiveness would go farther than bankruptcy, with its association with shame, blame, etc.

Originally posted on Eslkevin's Blog:

At G7 Summit Trade and Debt Policies Take Center Stage; Bishops Call on G7 to Enact Global Bankruptcy Process to End Poverty

By Sophia HarG7

The upcoming G7 summit focuses on global economic issues and conflicts in Ukraine and the Middle East. Pending international trade agreements and ongoing debt crises around the world will dominate the ‎conversation.

“Debt, tax and trade issues will take center stage at this year’s meeting,” noted Eric LeCompte, Executive Director of the religious development organization Jubilee USA Network. LeCompte was in Dresden, Germany, for last week’s G7 Finance Ministers gathering. “It’s right that economic stability is a priority on the agenda. Inequality and poverty drive conflict and instability around the world.”

Prior to the summit, G7 Finance Ministers met in Dresden, Germany, to address debt and tax issues. ‎During the finance minister meetings, Jubilee Germany organized a prayer service led by Dresden’s religious leaders that…

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Permaculture Brings Hope…before and after images!


One woman CAN make a difference! If you are not familiar with Colette’s accomplishments, this post illustrates some of them well. She is one of the people who inspire me hugely. ~ Linne

Originally posted on Bealtaine Cottage:

It’s been almost nine years since I began planting this smallholding in the west of Ireland. Before permaculture. Bealtaine CottageMany of you are familiar with the landscape as it looked then.

The picture above shows Bealtaine Cottage after a lot of cutting and clearing, around the time that the planting began. June 2011 permaculture cottage 021

This picture shows the same view today.

As you can see, the cottage is obscured…melting into the gardens of intense production.

Bealtaine Cottage before and after

The lonely, abandoned cottage on the first day I saw it.

Bealtaine Cottage driveway

Disappeared into the Permaculture Gardens of Bealtaine Cottage…nine years of planting by one woman and a spade!

Installin permaculture pond at Bealtaine CottageThis picture shows the Bog Garden after the first pond was created and the surrounding land cleaned up for planting.

Photographs taken at the time depict a barren looking, rushy, wet landscape that offered little hope or sanctuary for gardeners, growers, wildlife or Nature.

Permaculture Cottage July 2011 016The same view down to the pond is obscured…

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